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Released a year after the movie, it’s Fantastic Four: World’s Greatest Heroes! If you remember last week, when I wrote that this is most likely the last time we could see the Four on TV? Well, starting this January, Marvel is canceling the Fantastic Four comic series, with the storyline “The End Is Four-ever”. This won’t however affect the upcoming movie, though from what I’ve seen and heard about it, I wouldn’t be surprised if the mixed reactions had something to do with this. But, I digress, after the (moderate) success of the 2005 movie, Marvel and Moonscoop teamed up and brought us a new Fantastic Four cartoon. The show ran sporadically, with eight episodes airing in 2006 on Cartoon Network’s Toonami block,  then returned for nine episodes in 2007, since Rise Of The Silver Surfer was coming out at the time, then it aired on Boomerang for a short time, and finally aired on Nicktoons in 2010.

The series is slightly influenced by the movies, like Alicia and her father Puppet Master being made into African Americans, the origin (which is slightly different than the one seen in the film), most stories used  in  the show are original concepts, or loose adaptations of classic stores.

The series The first half of the series had a story arc explaining the Negative Zone (an alternate universe identical to Earth where everything is negatively charged), and Doctor Doom trying to steal it’s powers, while the second half had The Four fighting enemies from the comics, and teaming up with other Marvel heroes, the series ended with The Four battling galactic scavenger Terminus, (due to the creative team, being unable to use Galactus).

The show was OK, the show was a little uneasy, but it did have it’s moments, the team-ups with the other heroes (specifically Iron Man and Ant-Man) were a fun watch, as was the episodes Frightful (mainly because Spider-Man shows up as his alter ego), Bait and Switch, where The Four switch powers (and personalities), and Contest Of Champions, where The Four and three of their villains, and Impossible Man, play random games so the king of skill and chance, The Grandmaster, can keep the winner as a trophy. But other than that, the show is kind of a mixed bag, which makes since, it was inspired by the movie, after all, which is sucks, I expected better from the people behind Code: Lyoko. Maybe if they stuck strictly to the classic stories or completely adapt Ultimate Fantastic Four, maybe it would’ve been better recieved.

With that said, farewell Fantastic Four, here’s hoping Marvel brings your comic series someday in the future, and maybe even give you another shot at an animated adaptation.

Next time, the wall-crawler returns, in what could is probably considered the best adaptation, of the character, since the 90’s cartoon.

RANK: 3 out of 5

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